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Savory's monthly newsletter. See what's been happening around the Network.
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With winter slowly starting to recede in the northern hemisphere, our focus is shifting towards thriving in the growth and abundance of Spring.

Over the last few weeks, we've seen an abundance of new research published validating our decades of work in Holistic Management. It's a great reminder that no matter how cold the winter, warmth is on the way.

So, it's with this new Spring-like vitality and confidence that we dive into this month's newsletter...
NETWORK NEWS
SAVORY INSTITUTE
Letter to the New York Times Editor
In response to a recent New York Times opinion video on industrial agriculture, the Savory Institute penned this letter to the editor discussing nuances that are most often overlooked.
Read »
MICHIGAN HUB
Animal Source Foods In Healthy, Sustainable, And Ethical Diets
Dr. Jason Rowntree, Hub leader at Michigan State University, is co-author on this new research paper showing how animal source foods contribute to healthy, sustainable, and ethical diets, and why livestock should not be drastically limited in the food system.
Read More »

CENTRAL VIRGINIA HUB
[Podcast] Releasing Control To Foster Emergent Abundance
Daniel Griffith, Hub leader at the Robinia Institute in Virginia, was recently on the Death in the Garden podcast discussing resilience, abundance, letting go of control, and seeing ourselves within ecosystems rather than above them.
Listen »
WHAT WE'RE READING
THE NEW YORKER
Wendell Berry's Advice for a Cataclysmic Age
Sixty years after renouncing modernity, the writer is still contemplating a better way forward.
Read »
IFPRI
How Will Russia's Invasion of Ukraine Affect Global Food Security?
The consequences for global grain suppliers, natural gas, and fertilizer markets will negatively impact producers entering a new planting season.
Read »
THE COUNTER
Corn Ethanol Was Supposed To Help The Climate. Instead, Its Production May Have Made Things Worse.
A story of when corn & reductionist thinking collide.
Read »
DIGGING IN
ONE TOPIC IN DETAIL EACH MONTH
The Steps for Creating a Holistic Grazing Plan
For those of you who have never gone through the Holistic Planned Grazing process, it might be helpful to see how the sausage is made.

Grazing plans are generally created twice a year. For places that lack year-round vegetation growth, this amounts to an “open” growing season plan and a “closed” non-growing season plan.

The growing season plan is considered “open” because forage is actively growing and its volume is continually increasing, whereas the non-growing season plan is “closed” since you’re dealing with a finite amount of forage that must be rationed until the next growing season begins. The way you plan your moves in each of these plans will differ.

For both of these plans, there is a step-by-step process (detailed in an “aide memoire”, French for “memory aid”) to be followed. The steps should be done in order, and they center on these main questions:

  • What sort of landscape are you trying to create?
  • How much total forage will the grazing unit, or units, have to supply in the current planning period?
  • How much forage will an average hectare/acre of land have to supply?
  • How long will standing forage at the end of the growing season last in a nutritious state (including reserves for a late start to the growing season, drought, fires, wildlife, and so on)?
  • How long will animals spend in each paddock, or subdivision, and when will they return (the vital recovery period grazed plants require)?
  • Where and when will you need to concentrate animals most to maintain healthy grassland, reduce weeds or woody vegetation, or prevent soil erosion?

When following the aide memoire’s steps, which answer these questions, your responses are recorded on your grazing chart. The result is an easy-to-understand grazing plan, and anyone that understands the key insights of Holistic Management should be able to evaluate and determine where the animals are to go, why, and when.

Of course, all of this grazing planning is useless without a Holistic Context to help guide you through all the tough decisions that will inevitably arise along the way. You can plan moves ‘til you’re blue in the face, but if you do so outside the context of what’s most important to you, you might as well be planning for failure. Aligning your decisions with a Holistic Context is crucial for the long-term success of any grazing operation.

To learn more about Holistic Planned Grazing, see ebooks #8 and #9, and for more on developing a Holistic Context and how to ensure your grazing decisions are in line with it, see ebooks #4 and #5.

UPCOMING EVENTS
SOUTH AFRICA · MARCH 13 – 15 · ACHM (ZIMBABWE HUB)
Increase Crop Production—Using "Animal Impact"
This 2-day (3 night) workshop is for farmers and/or facilitators to learn how to kraal livestock on successive portions of harvested crop fields at night. This treatment has more than doubled (five times, in some cases) maize yields compared to community control fields.
Register »
NEVADA, USA · MARCH 17 MARCH 19 · UVE (NORTHERN CALIFORNIA HUB)
Holistic Planned Grazing Workshop
Join Tony Malmberg, Savory Master Field Professional, and Jared Sorensen, Savory Associate Educator, to develop a grazing plan for your land base that accounts for variables commonly overlooked.
Register »
Looking for more events?
Browse the full lineup at savory.global/calendar.
Savory Institute, 885 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80302, United States

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